mongoDB 2.6 and Node.js 0.10.29 on Raspberry Pi

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mongoDB on Raspberry PiA while back, I compiled mongoDB 2.1 for Raspberry Pi based upon instructions found on other sites and kind work by developers sharing code on Github.  I acquired a Raspberry Pi B+ and tried to compile mongoDB as I had done previously.  I quickly found out that the (old) compiled version (2.1.1) no longer functions under Raspbian.

I had also been trying out Arch Linux for R-Pi as it was “lighter” and did not include all the GUI/X components that I don’t use.  I use R-Pi for more server centric things and use frame buffer apps for video and images (omxplayer, fbi, fim).

I saw a comment to a posting when Googling for new info for mongoDB on R-Pi.  It said, simply, “use Arch Linux”.  So I did!  I had a little trouble getting Arch Linux to run on the B+ but after a firmware update obtained by a “pacman -Syu” on a R-Pi model B, I could now boot and use Arch Linux on the R-Pi B+ 🙂

I did simple installs via “pacman -S” for “mongodb” and “nodejs”.  I now have full mongoDB 2.6.3 with utilities, Node.js 0.10.29 and npm 1.4.21 working just fine.  Sure mongoDB is pretty slow and can only handle 2GB DBs but I’ve partitioned my data into multiple DBs and combine queries and results using JavaScript.

My effusive thanks go to the Arch Linux Package maintainers!

Software for the Crosley Radio-Pi

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I’ve been asked in emails and comments about what software I use on my 1942 Crosley Radio-Pi project.

I use the recommended Raspbian distro of Linux based on Debian Wheezy.  I normally do not start or use the GUI/X.  Many Raspberry Pi users use a Linux distro oriented around XBMC such as  OpenELEC or Raspbmc.  XBMC is a software media player that allows users to play and view most videos, music, podcasts, and other digital media files from local and network storage media and the internet.

While I have a Logitech K400 keyboard with touchpad attached via a USB dongle for “local” use, I almost always ssh into the R-Pi from my Mac.  The Radio-Pi  is connected to my home Wi-Fi network via an Edimax EW-7811UN Wi-Fi USB adapter (US$10 at Amazon).

More info on my frequently used apps and utilities after the break.   More

Raspberry Pi meets 1942 Crosley Radio

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crosley_radio_side_webA while back, I saw a picture online of a restored antique radio that caught my attention.  The accompanying  post described the process of restoration.  I’m not into radio restorations but I think the old wood radio cases are very “cool”.  I also recently contributed to a Kickstarter project for HDMIPi, an “affordable 9 inch High-Def screen for the Raspberry Pi”.  I thought that I might place the screen and R-Pi inside an old radio case.

After looking on eBay and craigslist, I could not find a suitable enclosure for the HDMIPi and paper mockups showed the screen to be a bit small at a distance.  I used my old original iPad as a test device for measurements and viewing.  I liked the viewing and pixel size of this its screen.crosley_radio_back_web

Well, the HDMIPi was going to be slow in coming (still is) and I saw (fairly) inexpensive 1024 X 768 iPad displays and driver boards on eBay.  I also found a old 1942 Crosley radio case that had a front cut-out that was very close to the iPad screen size.  The radio portion was not fixable so the case was reasonably “priced”.  I bid on it … and won.  I then had yet another project demanding time 😉

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Raspberry Pi meets mongoDB

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mongoDB on Raspberry PiI’ve been looking at noSQL databases in conjunction with Node.js. I have several Raspberry Pis that I have been using as development and test platforms. I have had good success with couchDB but have seen more examples and deployments using mongoDB. MongoDB is clearly developed on Intel processors but has been ported to non-Intel processors with different “endian”. Getting mongoDB to compile and run on a Raspberry Pi has been a challenge — as seen by the dearth of info when Googling. I did run across a couple of useful sites with links and directions on how to compile mongoDB on the R-Pi BUT both had a few problems. I’ve managed to get mongoDB version 2.1.1 working.  Specific instructions — More

node.js and CouchDB for Raspberry-Pi

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nodejs and CouchDBI have been looking at node.js for Javascript on the server and a no-sql DB, CouchDB. Lots of info out there for installing on the raspberry-pi BUT, most info is out of date.  Make sure you check dates and versions before following any compile &/or install instructions!

As of January 21, 2013, I have found the following work for me:

node.js can and should be installed from source.  It compiles and installs correctly for versions > 0.8.10. More general info can be found at node.js. Detailed instructions for installing on the R-Pi are on Jeremy Morgan’s blog.   Most current version is 0.8.18.

CouchDB can be installed via an “apt-get” for raspbian.  The latest version I’ve seen is 1.2.0.  More info on CouchDB is at couchdb.apache.org.

Excited to receive a Raspberry Pi® SBC

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Raspberry Pi SBCI ordered a Raspberry Pi Single Board Computer on the first day offered, on leap day, February 29, 2012, and received it on June 4, 2012.  A bit of a wait but I was excited to “play” with a $35, full-blown Linux-running, HDTV 1080p output, computer — and it was all for a great cause.  The Raspberry Pi Foundation is trying to do something about the situation where computers had become so expensive and arcane that programming experimentation on them had to be forbidden by parents; and to find a platform that, like previous generations of home computers, could boot into a programming environment.

I’m planning on using multiple R-Pi SBCs as mini servers and for real-time sensing and control of various devices.  Now, where did I put my soldering iron and multimeter?

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